How Dr. Fred Alger is Responding to COVID-19: Read Here

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  • 3 Month Recare Procedure (View Transcript)

    Periodontal disease cannot be cured. It can only be controlled. That’s why we need to examine you every three months. If periodontal disease isn’t closely monitored and controlled, it can quickly worsen destroying bone and soft tissue, and this could lead to the loss of a tooth. When we first find periodontal disease, we treat it with scaling and root planing to remove plaque, tarter, and bacteria from beneath your gums.

    This treatment disrupts the growth of the bacteria, but some remain and settle back into the pocket where they reproduce. In fact, the number of bacteria doubles every time they reproduce reaching destructive levels in as few as 90 days. It can be challenging to predict where in your mouth the symptoms of periodontal disease may recur or when and frequently it doesn’t hurt.

    The only way to find and control it is with a professional exam that specifically looks for the disease. This also means that a twice a year cleaning schedule just isn’t safe for those who have periodontal disease. It’s important that you come in every three months for a periodontal maintenance appointment, which may include taking x-rays, measuring the depth of periodontal pockets, checking for any bleeding or loose teeth. Removing plaque above and below the gum line and talking with you about the effectiveness of your home care if necessary.
    We may also retreat with scaling and root planing or apply a medication or antimicrobial rinse periodontal maintenance visits. Help us break the stronghold of bacteria in your gums and slow or eliminate their destructive effects.

  • Bone Grafting Procedure
  • Cone-Beam-X-Ray-Procedure (View Transcript)

    X-rays are an important diagnostic tool in dentistry, but x-rays can only give a two dimensional side view. Now, cone beam x-ray technology produces a high resolution three dimensional color image with unprecedented detail. We can zoom through the image to view bone and soft tissue with incredible accuracy.

    And we can see images from every angle, including the biting surfaces of teeth. This can be used to create a 3-D model to be used for planning and eliminate the need to take a traditional impression. To get a cone beam CT scan simply ease into the chin rest. The procedure usually takes only a few seconds and can be done right here in our office.

    As the camera moves around your head, a cone shaped beam gets a complete x-ray. The precision of the 3-D image is extremely useful in placing implants, planning orthodontic treatment, locating root canals, evaluating problems with the jaw joints, and diagnosing possible cysts, tumors or infections at earlier stages.

    Cone beam x-rays help us plan your treatment with increased accuracy and a more detailed diagnosis. It’s a technological advancement that helps us improve your oral health.

  • Crown Lengthening Procedure (View Transcript)

    To restore a tooth. There must be enough healthy tooth structure to support the restoration. If the tooth has been broken or severely decayed near the gum line, we may perform a crown lengthening procedure. Crown lengthening allows us to access more of the strong tooth structure by removing some of the gum or bone surrounding the tooth.

    We’ll begin the procedure once we’re sure the area is completely numb. Then we make a small incision and gently lift the gums away from the tooth. We reshape the bone and gum tissue to reveal enough of the natural tooth to create a secure anchor for the crown and to maintain a healthy distance between the bone and gum line.

    Then a couple of stitches are placed in the gums to speed healing. After a few weeks of healing, we may build up the core of the tooth and then we prepare the tooth for the crown. We then place the crown to cover and protect the damage tooth. This procedure saves and restores the tooth that might otherwise be lost.
    This allows the gums to reattach properly to the tooth and makes the area where the crown meets the tooth accessible and easy to clean. Crown lengthening can help restore a tooth that might otherwise be lost and save your healthy smile.

  • Diabetes and Periodontal Disease (View Transcript)

    If you have diabetes, you have an increased risk of developing periodontal disease. Diabetes contributes to periodontal disease in several ways. It can lower your body’s ability to fight off infection and can slow healing. It also causes dry mouth and often results in high blood sugar levels. Your blood vessels bring oxygen and nutrients to your tissues, including your mouth and remove wastes.

    Diabetes causes the blood vessels to thicken and become less elastic, making you less resistant to infections like periodontal disease. Diabetics often experience a decrease in the flow of saliva. This can lead to a condition called a dry mouth or xerostomia. A lack of saliva allows plaque, the sticky film of food and bacteria to build up easily on teeth.

    This accumulation of plaque is the main cause of periodontal disease. Having poorly controlled diabetes also means that there often is an excess level of glucose in the blood and saliva. It is thought that this higher level may encourage the growth of the bacteria and plaque that are responsible for periodontal disease.

    We want to work with your physician to monitor your diabetes and keep you in good health. You have to do your part by maintaining a meticulous home care routine. Together we can help keep you healthy and free of periodontal disease.

  • Diagnosing Gingivitis (View Transcript)

    Gingivitis, also known as gum disease, is inflammation of the gums. It’s often the first stage of periodontal disease. Some of the warning signs of gingivitis include bleeding when brushing or flossing. Redness where the gums and tooth meet swollen gums and bad breath. Gingivitis usually begins when plaque, the sticky, colorless film of bacteria and food that constantly forms on your teeth.

    It’s not cleaned away daily. It’s hard to see plaque, but look at how it shows up after we’ve stained it with red dye. When plaque stays on your teeth for two or three days, it can harden into tartar. Tartar, which is stained blue, can irritate your gums and lead to ginger. Vidas. Gum disease can also be caused by certain medical conditions, certain medications, trauma or smoking or chewing tobacco.

    During pregnancy, hormonal changes can contribute to determine if you have gingivitis. We’ll examine your mouth looking for red, swollen, or bleeding gums. Because gingivitis can advance to periodontal disease. We may take x-rays to check bone levels. We may also check the depth of the pockets around your teeth.

    If you do have gingivitis, we’ll thoroughly clean your teeth in the office and may schedule you for cleanings more often. We might suggest a special mouthwash or rinse and discuss your home care technique. The good news is that gingivitis is reversible. The sooner we catch it, the better chance you have of keeping your smile for a lifetime.

  • Diagnosing Periodontal Disease (View Transcript)

    Periodontal disease is the number one reason adults lose teeth. That’s because as periodontal disease advances, the infection can destroy the ligaments and bone that supports your teeth. If you have periodontal disease, your gums may bleed when you brush or floss and they may be soft, swollen, or tender.

    You may have persistent bad breath. Your gums may also start to pull away from your teeth and your teeth may become loose. The main cause of periodontal disease is the long term buildup of plaque, the sticky, colorless film of food and bacteria that constantly forms on your teeth. It’s hard to see plaque, but look at how it shows up after we’ve stained it with red dye.

    When plaque stays on your teeth for two or three days, it can harden into tartar. The bacteria and plaque invade the spaces between the teeth and gums and begin producing toxins. These toxins combined with your body’s reaction to them, destroy the bone around your teeth, and once lost bone never comes back on its own.

    If there’s not enough support for the teeth and they become loose, they might have to be removed to determine if you have periodontal disease. We perform a thorough examination, which includes taking x-rays to determine how much bone has been lost. We measured the depth of the pockets with a probe. Or reading of more than three millimeters could be a sign of periodontal disease, and we’ll pay careful attention to those areas.

    If we find periodontal disease, we’ll talk about treatment options and proper home care. We want to help you maintain the health of your teeth, gums, and bone, and restore your healthy smile.

  • Esthetic Crown Lengthening (View Transcript)

    An aesthetic crown lengthening sometimes called a gum lift is a safe and predictable procedure for reshaping bone and gum tissues when teeth appear too short or when the gum line is uneven. We’ll begin the procedure when we’re sure the area is completely numb, we then make small incisions in the gums and gently lift them away from the tooth.

    We reshape the bone and gum tissue to reveal more of the natural tooth, and to maintain a healthy distance between the bone and gum line. Then a couple of stitches are placed in the gums to speed healing. After a few weeks, the gums will heal completely. If necessary, we can then bond a crown, or composite resin restoration to improve the shape of the tooth and aesthetic.

    Crown lengthening can make a dramatic improvement in the look of your teeth and help you get the smile of your dreams.

    Flap-Procedure
    If you have deep gum pockets infected with periodontal disease, we may perform flap surgery to help the area heal. This procedure, sometimes called a pocket reduction, may be necessary when gum pockets are so deep that scaling and root planing cannot remove the infection.

    To begin the procedure, we first make sure all the areas are completely numb. Then we gently separate the gums from the tooth. This creates a flap and gives us access to the bone and tooth root. We remove any plaque, tartar, bacteria, and infected tissue from the area. We may then smooth the bone around the teeth. This will limit the areas where bacteria can hide and help the gums reattach to the tooth.

    In some cases we may also apply special proteins or other treatments that help reattachment. The gums are then secured with a few stitches. As the gum tissue heals, it tightens more closely around the tooth. Periodontal flap surgery removes the source of infection, reduces the size of the gum pockets, helps the gum tissue heal and reattach to the bone and makes it easier to keep the area plaque free.

    It’s an effective method for treating deep-seated periodontal disease and restoring your health.

    Digital-X-Ray-Procedure

    A full mouth series of X rays is one of the first steps in a thorough dental examination. We use them to find cavities between the teeth, worn out fillings and crowns, tarter on the roots, receding bone levels and abscesses. We placed the x-ray sensor in specific locations to thoroughly evaluate your entire mouth.

    The lead apron protects the rest of your body while we take the x-rays. Digital x-rays sensors are quite sensitive, so the amount of radiation exposure is very low. In fact, compared to conventional x-rays, digital x-ray systems can reduce the amount of radiation up to 80%. A full mouth set of x-rays is an important part of a thorough dental examination.

    It helps us keep your mouth healthy by giving us vital information that we can’t get from any other source.

  • Periodontal Flap Surgery
  • Full Series Digital X-Ray Procedure
  • Home Care and Brushing (View Transcript)

    Proper toothbrushing involves five things, a soft toothbrush, toothpaste with fluoride, brushing long enough, the correct brushing action. I’m brushing at least twice a day. You can use a manual or electric toothbrush. Just make sure it has soft bristles. Soft bristles are kinder to your teeth and gums, and they make it much easier to remove the plaque below the gum line where gum disease starts.

    Use a pea sized amount of toothpaste that contains fluoride. Fluoride strengthens the outer enamel layer of the teeth. It can stop a cavity in its tracks and give you more resistance to future cavities. Make sure your brushing routine lasts long enough to thoroughly remove plaque. We recommend that you brush for at least two minutes. To start, center your brush on the gum line, and angle the bristles at a 45 degree angle.

    Apply gentle pressure. So the bristles slide under the gum line. Gently vibrate the brush while you move it in. Short, circular wiggling motions. Brush one or two teeth at a time. Then move to the neighboring teeth, allowing some overlap. Use this method to brush the insides and outsides of all the teeth to brush the backs of the front teeth, tilt the brush and make several up and down strokes.

    Then brush the chewing surfaces of the teeth with a gentle back and forth scrubbing motion, and by brushing your tongue and the roof of your mouth, this removes germs and keeps your breath fresh. You can use a tongue brush with a special head to do the job or a tongue scraper to remove the odor causing bacteria when you brush.

    Brushing after breakfast cleans away the morning’s food, debris and brushing your teeth before bedtime protects your teeth all night. Follow our advice for better brushing, and you’ll enjoy a cleaner, fresher, healthier mouth.

  • Home Care and Flossing (View Transcript)
    People who floss every day are taking a significant step in keeping their teeth clean and healthy. Periodontal disease and many cavities start between the teeth where the bristles of your brush simply can’t reach. That’s why flossing is necessary for removing the plaque and bacteria that caused these dental diseases to begin.Pull out 18 inches of floss and wind it around the middle fingers of each hand, leaving about five inches in between. Hold the floss between your thumbs and index fingers, leaving about one inch to work with. Gently glide the floss between the teeth using a gentle side to side motion. Pull the floss tightly in a C shape around the side of the tooth, and slide the floss under the gum line.

    Move the floss up and down several times to remove all the food and bacteria. Then pull the floss around the neighboring tooth and repeat the process. Wind the floss to a fresh section and gradually work your way around your mouth, cleaning both sides of every tooth. If your gums are infected, they’ll bleed when you floss, and that’s to be expected.

    If you are just beginning to floss after a week or so of regular flossing, the bleeding should go away. If you have problems reaching some areas, you may want to use a floss fork or other flossing aids. Tell us if your teeth are too tight to floss or if it catches or tears. This indicates that there may be problems in your mouth that need to be fixed.

    Let us know if you have any questions about your flossing, we’ll be happy to recommend the best floss for you and offer tips for keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

  • Home Care and Periodontal Disease (View Transcript)

    If you have gum pockets or lost bone around your teeth due to periodontal disease, regular brushing and flossing aren’t enough to remove the plaque from your teeth. Instead, it takes special tools and techniques. Here’s why. In a healthy mouth, the space between your teeth and gums, called the sulcus, is about two to three millimeters deep, and your brush and floss can effectively reach these areas.

    However, with periodontal disease, the sulcus deepens and forms a pocket that is more than three millimeters. Regular cleaning tools just can’t clean that deeply. Also, in a healthy mouth, the bone level is high and the gums attach at the next of the teeth. The exposed tooth surface is smooth, so the floss can make full contact with the area to keep it thoroughly clean.

    However, periodontal disease causes the bone levels to fall and the attachments to recede. This exposes the root surfaces, which have indentions floss stretches across these indentions so it can’t remove the plaque that has formed in them. Special instruments are necessary to reach below three millimeters and to thoroughly clean the gum pockets and root indentions.

    Each instrument is useful in different areas of your mouth and we’ll be happy to recommend the right ones for your situation. We’ll also show you how to use them effectively for keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

  • Home Care and the Electric Tooth Brush (View Transcript)

    Electric toothbrushes have become more and more popular for a variety of reasons. They do a good job of reducing stains, removing plaque, and disrupting the bacteria that can cause tooth decay and gum disease. Electric toothbrushes can be easier to manage than a manual toothbrush, and they’re fun to use.

    No matter why you’ve chosen an electric toothbrush, it’s important to use it correctly. You should brush for at least two minutes. Make sure the brush head has soft bristles because these are kinder to your teeth and gums. Apply a pea sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Place the toothbrush in your mouth and close your lips slightly to prevent splattering.

    Hold your jaw in a relaxed, open position so you can reach all tooth surfaces. Send her your brush on the gum line and angle the bristles according to the manufacturer’s directions. Turn the toothbrush on, holding it gently against the tooth and gum line for a few seconds. Don’t press hard. Let the toothbrush do the work, then move to the next tooth.

    Make sure you brush the insides and outsides of all the teeth, including the backs of the front teeth and all the chewing surfaces. Your brushing schedule is important too. Brushing after breakfast, cleans away the mornings, food, debris, and brushing your teeth before bedtime protects your teeth all night.

    Ask us if you have any questions about using your electric toothbrush. We’ll be happy to offer tips for better brushing for a clean, fresh, healthy mouth.

  • Implant Augmentation Procedure (View Transcript)

    When several neighboring teeth are missing an implant supported bridge is an excellent treatment for replacing them, although each case will be different. Placing an implant supported bridge generally involves several phases. We’ll start when we’re sure you’re comfortable. An opening is made in your gums and a channel for each implant is shaped in the bone.

    Next we place the implants into the prepared channels. Sometimes covers are placed on the implants and the gums are stitched closed, where healing. In other cases, a healing cap or an extension is attached to each implant, and then a temporary bridge may be placed over the implants. Healing may take several months as the implants become securely fused to the bone.

    The next phase includes a series of appointments to fabricate your final restoration. If necessary, we’ll first uncover the implants and attach the extensions. Then we generally take impressions and bite registrations of your mouth. The lab uses these materials to make an accurate model of your mouth, including the implants.

    They’ll use the model to create a bridge that precisely fits the implants and your bite. Next. Depending on the circumstances, we may have you try in the bridge framework or we’ll try in the final bridge. We check the fit and your bite and when everything is right, we’ll attach your beautiful final bridge.

    An implant supported bridge has several advantages. The implants stop the bone loss that occurs when teeth are lost. The bridge prevents the surrounding teeth from shifting into the space. And unlike a traditional bridge, there’s no need to reduce neighboring teeth. With proper home care and regular checkups, your implant can provide a long lasting natural looking smile.

  • Immediate Implant Placement (View Transcript)

    When a tooth must be extracted, we can sometimes place an implant in the socket immediately after the tooth has been removed. First we make sure you’re comfortable and then we remove the tooth. We reshape the extraction site and place the body of the implant into the prepared socket. In many cases, we’ll then add bone grafting material to the socket to help the jaw bone heal tightly around the implant.

    A healing cap or an extension is attached to the implant. We then close the gums and depending on the situation, we may place a temporary replacement tooth. Over the next several months, the implant will become securely fused to the bone. The next phase includes a series of appointments to fabricate your permanent restoration.

    Situations vary, but they usually include removing the temporary and making impressions of your mouth. The lab uses the impressions to make an accurate model of your mouth, including the implant. They’ll use the model to create a restoration that precisely fits the implant and your bite. When it’s ready, we’ll check the fit and your bite and then secure your beautiful replacement tooth and immediately placed implant has several advantages.

    Extraction and implant placement can occur during the same procedure. The implant stops the bone loss that normally occurs when a tooth is lost and it prevents the surrounding teeth from shifting into this space. And unlike replacing a tooth with a traditional bridge, there’s no need to reduce neighboring teeth with proper home care and regular checkups, your implant can provide a long lasting natural looking smile.

  • Implant Overdenture Lower Procedure (View Transcript)

    When all the teeth in an arch are missing. An excellent treatment for replacing them is a denture secured with implants. Depending on your situation, the denture may snap onto the implants in your jaw, or it may clip to a bar that’s attached to the implants. These systems keep the denture secure in your mouth, but allow you to remove it when necessary.

    We’ll begin the procedure when we’re sure you’re comfortable. Openings are made in your gums and a channel for each implant is made in the bone. Then we place the implants into the prepared channels. Covers are placed on the implants and the gums may be stitched closed where healing during the healing period, you might wear a temporary denture or your own denture can be modified.

    Healing may take several months as the implants become securely fused to the bone. The next phase starts with a series of appointments to fabricate your permanent denture. If your gums were stitched closed, we will gently expose the implants. Then we generally take impressions and bite registrations.

    The lab uses these materials to make an accurate model of your mouth. They’ll use the model to create a denture that precisely fits the implants and your bite. When it’s ready, we’ll place the denture onto the implants. Check the fit and your bite, and you’ll have your beautiful new denture. Dentures attached to implants have several advantages.

    The implants slow or stop the loss of bone that occurs when teeth are missing. The dentures are stable in the mouth, which makes it more comfortable to talk and chew. And the dentures are removable for easy cleaning and checkups. With proper home care and regular checkups, your implant retained denture can provide a secure and natural looking smile.

  • Implant Overdenture Upper Procedure (View Transcript)

    When all the teeth in an arch are missing. An excellent treatment for replacing them is a denture secured with implants. Depending on your situation, the denture may snap onto the implants in your jaw, or it may clip to a bar that’s attached to the implants. These systems keep the denture secure in your mouth, but allow you to remove it when necessary.

    We’ll begin when we’re sure you’re comfortable. Openings are made in your gums and a channel for each implant is made in the bone. Then we place the implants into the prepared channels. Covers are placed on the implants and the gums may be stitched closed where healing during the healing period, you might wear a temporary denture or your own denture can be modified to fit.

    Healing may take several months, as the implants become securely fused to the bone. The next phase starts with a series of appointments to fabricate your denture. If your gums were stitched closed, we will gently expose the implants. Then we generally take impressions and bite registrations. The lab uses these materials to make an accurate model of your mouth.

    They’ll use the model to create a denture that precisely fits the implants and your bite. When it’s ready, we’ll place the denture onto the implants, check the fit and your bite, and you’ll have your beautiful new denture. Upper dentures attached to implants have several advantages. The implants slow or stop the loss of jaw bone that occurs when teeth are missing.

    The dentures are stable in the mouth and they can often be shaped so that they don’t cover the palette. This makes it easier to talk, chew and taste your food, and the dentures are removable for easy cleaning and checkups. With proper home care and regular checkups, your implant retained denture can provide a secure and natural looking smile.

  • IV Sedation Procedure (View Transcript)

    If you put off needed dental treatment because you’re afraid of the procedures, then IV sedation might be right for you. Intravenous sedation can help if you get extremely nervous at the dentist’s office wanting to have several procedures in a single visit, don’t want to remember the dental procedures or have a difficult time getting numb before we use IV sedation.

    We’ll discuss all of your sedation options with you. We’ll take a medical history and ask if you are allergic to any medications on the day of your appointment. You must bring a responsible adult who will stay with you for the entire day. We’ll take your blood pressure before we begin. Our staff is highly trained and will monitor you throughout the procedure.

    A simple device clipped onto your finger will give us a constant readout of your pulse and oxygen levels. If you are nervous about getting the intravenous sedative, we may offer you nitrous oxide first to help you relax. When the sedative begins, you will go into a deep state of relaxation almost immediately.

    You will be unaware of the procedure, but you will still be able to respond to conversation. We’ll begin the procedure when we’re sure the area is numb. During the procedure, time will pass very quickly for you and you won’t be distracted by the sights, sounds or aromas of the dental office. When we’re done and we remove the sedation, you will awaken with no memory of the procedure.

    We’ll take your blood pressure one more time. In about half an hour, you’ll be alert enough to go home. However, a responsible adult must drive you and stay with you for the rest of the day. Once you leave our office. Don’t operate a motor vehicle. Don’t do any strenuous activity. Plan to relax for the rest of the day.

    When you’re hungry, only eat a light meal. Don’t drink alcohol and only take medications as directed by your dentist. IV sedation is a safe procedure that can help you get the dental care you need and back on the road to good oral health.

  • Nitrous Oxide Procedure
  • Oral Conscious Sedation Procedure (View Transcript)

    Oral conscious sedation is a method that helps certain patients cope more comfortably with dental appointments. We may recommend it if you are anxious about dental appointments, have difficulty getting numb with local anesthesia, have a severe gag response or certain physical limitations, or want to have a lot of dental work done during a single longer appointment.

    To plan the best treatment for you. We’ll need to know about your current medical conditions and medications along with allergic reactions you’ve had to any medication. Here’s how an appointment using oral conscious sedation typically goes. First, we may ask you not to eat or drink anything for 12 hours before your appointment, and then you’ll take an oral medication about an hour before your appointment.

    Because the medication will make you groggy. You’ll need a friend or relative to bring you to the office. We’ll assess how deeply you’re sedated and adjust your medication if necessary to keep you comfortable. In most cases, it will also be necessary to numb your mouth. We’ll constantly monitor your pulse, blood pressure and oxygen levels to ensure your safety during the procedure.

    You won’t be aware of time passing. You’ll feel very comfortable and relaxed and may even sleep, but you’ll respond easily to touch and our requests. After the procedure, your friend or relative will take you home where you’ll relax for the rest of the day. Let us know if you’d like to try oral conscious sedation for a more comfortable dental appointment.

  • Office Information About Insurance (View Transcript)

    Dental insurance. It can be confusing and to make matters worse, every insurance plan handles things differently. Dental insurance plans are a contract between you and your insurance provider. It’s important that you read your insurance policy or talk to your insurance representative so you can understand how your plan helps pay for dental treatment.

    Some plans pay only for dentists’ who belong to the plan’s network. While others let you see the dentist of your choice to determine how much they’ll pay for dental treatment. Insurance plans use several methods. One is called the table of allowances in which the plan lists the treatments it’ll pay for and the amount it’ll pay for each.

    Another very common method is called UCR. This stands for usual, customary and reasonable. In these cases, the plan calculates a maximum amount allowed for a particular treatment and then pays 50 to 80% of that amount. You pay 20 to 50% of the remaining. You see our fees plus the difference between the actual cost of the treatment and the insurance plans, UCR fees.

    Most people assume that insurance companies base their fees on statistics, but while statistics are gathered, insurance companies are not required to use them, and sometimes the statistics are out of date. This means that the insurance plans, UCR fees are usually not representative of what local dentists actually charge.

    In fact, different insurance companies, dental plans, often have a different set of UCR fees for the same geographical area and for the same group of dentists’, and it’s not unusual for the same insurance company to pay different UCR fees to the same dental office, depending on which of the company’s plans the patient is enrolled in.

    You should also know that most insurance plans have not kept up with advances in dentistry. They may cover only minimum quality materials and services and exclude treatments that they label as discretionary. Even common treatments such as implants, white fillings, bonding, fluoride treatments, and some periodontal care.

    In addition, dental coverage maximums haven’t kept up with the times. Back in 1960 a typical annual maximum benefit was $1,000. These days, many plans still offer that same maximum, but to stay up with inflation, that $1,000 in 1960 would have had to increase to more than $6,500 today. This is why it’s very common for patients to choose dental treatment that their dental insurance plan won’t fully pay for.

    Even though most plans pay for only basic services, we believe that you should be able to choose the most appropriate dental treatment for you and your family.

  • Office Information About the HIPAA Notice (View Transcript)

    The term HIPAA stands for the health insurance portability and accountability act. It is a set of standards created by Congress to streamline the flow of information in the health care system and to protect your personal health information. HIPAA regulations apply to most health plans and to any healthcare provider who transmits healthcare information electronically.

    Some of your rights under HIPAA include: Confidentiality regarding your protected health care information, access to your information and the rights to copy, amend and restrict access to it. The right to file a complaint with the us department of health and human services about how your healthcare information has been used and an accounting of how your healthcare information has been disclosed.

    Your rights and the privacy of your healthcare information are important to us. As part of our compliance with HIPAA, we’ll provide you with a notice of privacy practices and ask you to sign a form acknowledging that you’ve received the notice. We’re always glad to answer any of your questions about our privacy practices or your rights under the health insurance portability and accountability act.

  • Oral Sedation for Children (View Transcript)

    If your child is especially anxious about visiting the dentist or needs extensive work, we may recommend oral conscious sedation to help your child relax before the appointment. We’ll give you instructions on when food and liquids should be stopped. You should also plan to have a responsible adult stay with your child after the procedure.

    So you may need to plan for the day off of work on the day of your appointment. You’ll need to arrive about a half hour early. We’ll give your child the minimal amount of sedative possible in juice, and when we see your child getting sleepy, we’ll know that it’s working. Be assured our staff is trained and certified in sedation.

    We’ll monitor breathing and heart rate throughout their procedure. Your child will still be able to respond to speech and touch while comfortable and pain free. There will probably be no memory of being in the dentist chair. We want you to stay for awhile after the procedure so we can monitor the recovery after the appointment.

    You should take your child home to rest for the next several hours. Please don’t send your child to daycare or to school. Don’t allow your child to ride a bike or a skateboard for the rest of the day. We’ll also give you some instructions on home care. Oral conscious sedation can be a relaxing and comfortable way for your child to get the treatment they need.

  • Post-Op Instructions for Periodontal Surgery (View Transcript)

    Now that you’ve had surgery on your gums, it’s important to make sure you’re as comfortable as possible. To maximize the chance for success, relax and avoid all strenuous activities for the first 24 hours following surgery. If we used an anesthetic during the procedure, don’t eat anything for two hours after surgery.

    When you do feel comfortable enough to eat, if you still have any numbness, be careful not to bite your cheeks or tongue. To control discomfort, take pain medication before the anesthetic has worn off or as recommended. It’s normal to experience some discomfort for several days after surgery. Generally, don’t take pain medication on an empty stomach, or you may experience nausea.

    Make sure you follow the directions for the first six hours after surgery. Apply an ice pack 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off. To decrease pain and swelling after 24 hours. Reduce discomfort or swelling by rinsing your mouth very gently three times a day with warm salt water. Use about one teaspoon of salt per glass of warm water.

    Some slight bleeding is normal for a day or so following surgery. If bleeding persists, apply firm pressure with a gauze pad or bite on a clean, moist tea bag for 20 minutes. Call us if this doesn’t control bleeding or if bleeding increases for the first week. Restrict your diet to soft foods such as yogurt, scrambled eggs and soup until you can comfortably chew and then chew on the side of your mouth opposite to the surgery site.

    Avoid alcoholic drinks and hot or spicy foods for at least a week after surgery. Brush and floss the non-treated areas of your mouth normally. Clean the treated areas by gently rinsing with warm water or mouthwash, but avoid frequent or vigorous rinsing or brushing until the area has healed. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time.

    Even if all symptoms and signs of infection are gone, call us. If discomfort is not diminishing day by day or swelling increases or continues beyond three or four days. And please call us anytime if you have questions or concerns.

  • Pregnancy and Periodontal Disease (View Transcript)

    When you’re pregnant, your hormonal activity increases, and that can lead to a number of oral conditions. Increased levels of estrogen and progesterone can make it easier for bacteria and plaque to grow. Bleeding gums are common during this time, and you may develop pregnancy gingivitis. Ignore gingivitis during pregnancy and it can develop into periodontal disease, an infection of the teeth, gums and bone that in severe cases can lead to tooth loss.

    At the site of the gingivitis, you could also develop a pregnancy tumor. This growth is usually deep red, soar and bleeds easily. Although this tumor is not cancerous, it can be very uncomfortable. It can go away after you deliver your baby, or your dentists may suggest removing it.

    Gingivitis can also affect the health of your unborn baby. To fight the infection your body produces prostoglandins, which may signal your body to begin labor resulting in a premature birth, and it can increase the risk of preeclampsia, a potentially serious form of high blood pressure to prevent injury gingivitis and periodontal disease, floss daily, and brush your teeth with a soft bristle toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste after each meal.

    If toothpaste makes you nauseated, you can brush with plain water and rinse with an anti plaque or fluoridated mouthwash. If you’re pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant soon. Talk to us about regular checkups and proper home care to keep your health the best it can be.

  • Professional Care and Hygienist
  • Ridge Preservation Procedure
  • Scaling and Root Planing Procedure
  • Single Implant Procedure
  • Sinus Lift Procedure
  • Smoking and Periodontal Disease
  • Soft Tissue Laser Procedure
  • Subepithelial Gingival Graft Procedure
  • Ultrasonic Scaling Procedure
  • What is a Frenectomy?
  • What is Gingival Recession?
  • What is an Implant?
  • What is Co-Diagnosis?
  • What is Pericornititis?
  • Why a Single Implant?
  • Why Implants for Full Edentulous Patients?
  • Why Implants for Partially Edentulous Patients?
  • Kirby Brushing – Comedy (View Transcript)

    Chapter three, the Kirby technique, the cool brushing. As Kirby’s dreams continued, he remembered all the mistakes he made when he first started to learn to brush his teeth. His dental hygienist had said, move your toothbrush back and forth, not your head, and don’t worry if your ears flop a little.

    Vibrate the brush and move it slowly back and forth in small circular motions. Now those giant back and forth strokes, try a lot of different angles of wrapper. But this is the one that works the best. Don’t use the biggest toothbrush you can find. Use the right size brush with soft bristles.

    Use a toothpaste with fluoride and carefully place it on your brush. Brush in the bathroom in front of a mirror, not upside down. Move an electric toothbrush gently around your mouth. Don’t bite on it. I never take it apart. Kirby learned his lessons. Well. In fact, his techniques became legendary. The Kirby technique of cool brushing was an international success.

    As Kirby talked to people, he would explain, you start with the insides of the upper teeth. Then go to the insides of the lower teeth. Then the outsides of the upper teeth and the lower teeth, don’t forget the chewing surfaces of the upper teeth and the lower teeth and the brush to brush the backs of your upper and lower front teeth and by brushing the roof of your mouth.

    And gently brush your tongue. Kirby traveled far and wide teaching children the amazing Kirby technique of cool brushing.

  • Kirby Flossing – Comedy (View Transcript)

    Chapter four, flossing is a big deal. Kirby had heard flossing was important. He’d heard it was a big deal. He started flossing every day with very big floss. He soon learned that really big floss was a lot like brushing. It just couldn’t get the plaque out from between his teeth. Kirby got very excited.

    When he found smaller floss that worked better. Kirby really liked dental floss. It tasted good and was only a little tricky to handle. As he continued to practice, his flossing kept getting better and better. He soon perfected his floss and tucking by using about 18 inches, winding it around the middle fingers of his hands.

    And then carefully pinching the floss between his thumb and first finger, leaving about an inch to work with. He learned to carefully pull the floss in a C shape around each tooth and then clean the sides of the tooth using an up and down motion. He found it best to occasionally wind the floss to a fresh section, and then he would work his way around his mouth, cleaning both sides of every tooth.

    Kirby liked to floss. It wasn’t hard to learn, and it removed the rest of the plaque between his teeth where the toothbrush bristles just couldn’t reach.